Eastern Airways Urges UK Government to Reconsider Emissions Trading Scheme

Eastern Airways, a UK based airline operating in the UK out of Norwich, has pushed for a reassessment of the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) reporting practices by the UK Government.

Eastern Airways chairman, Bryan Huxford, said, ‘The Emissions Trading Scheme, implemented by Brussels earlier this year is good in theory but, for Europe’s smaller carriers, is a disaster in practice’ says. ‘I find it unbelievable that the scheme results in the cost of administration equalling or exceeding the cost of compliance for smaller airlines.

Eastern Airways, together with every other European airline takes very seriously the need to minimise the impact of its flights on climate change, even though we already have an aircraft fleet that is extremely fuel efficient. However, the Emissions Trading Scheme for aviation, implemented by the European Community is far from being in the interests of Eastern Airways’ customers.

The high price of fuel already gives us the strongest possible incentive to be as fuel efficient as possible without the imposition of ETS. We do not object to buying the carbon allowances but we see no sense whatsoever in obliging our passengers to pay, through their fares, for complex and precise reporting procedures that contribute nothing to environmental protection.’

The airline expects that apart from global concerns, climate protection is also a concern for the airline because of its business interests. The ETS legislation will be expected to complicate administration of the fuel usage reporting, as cost of administration of the same would be more than the price of the carbon allowances the airline will be acquiring.

Mike Ambrose, the director general of the European Regions Airline Association (ERA), said, ‘Forcing small airlines to adopt reporting procedures that demand a level of precision many dimensions different from the inexactness of climate change science is absurd. If the European Commission and European Parliament members had listened to the industry when the scheme was drafted, such a ridiculous situation would have been avoided.

Earlier this month, David Cameron urged the EU to cut its bureaucracy. If the UK government fails to act to cut through this wasteful red tape, it will be passengers who will continue to fund this needless bureaucracy.’

easyJet Warns of Flight Disruption in Europe

easyJet, the UK based airline, has announced a warning for its passengers flying to various destinations in Europe of a possible industrial action.

The airline is expecting hundreds of flights being cancelled and rescheduled across Europe, in view of a Europe-wide general strike called on Wednesday, November 14, 2012. The strike has been called by the European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC), and will take place at different times in different countries.

The airline, in a statement, said, ‘easyJet has been advised of a General strike on 14th November organised by the European Trade Union Confederation with strikes and demonstrations across Europe.

This will effect different countries at different times during the day of the 14th November Spain and the Canary Islands will operate a 24 hour strike period from 00:01 to 23:59 and Greece will operate the strike period from 12:00/15:00.

easyJet are proactively trying to minimize disruption, however, we would like to warn customers that they could experience delays, to their travel plans.

Therefore it is with regret the following flights will either be delayed, rescheduled, or cancelled due to this action. We advise passengers planning to travel to/from these countries on 14th November to keep checking our website for updates.’

Bernadette Segol, the ETUC general secretary, said, ‘By sowing austerity, we are reaping recession, rising poverty and social anxiety. In some countries, people’s exasperation is reaching a peak. We need urgent solutions to get the economy back on track, not stifle it with austerity. Europe’s leaders are wrong not to listen to the anger of the people who are taking to the streets.

The Troika can no longer behave so arrogantly and brutally towards the countries which are in difficulty. They must urgently address the issues of jobs and social fiscal justice and they must stop their attacks on wages, social protection and public services.

The ETUC is calling for a social compact for Europe with a proper social dialogue, an economic policy that fosters quality jobs, and economic solidarity among the countries of Europe. We urgently need to change course.’